CryptoFighters – engaging new Ethereum-based battling game

Ever wish you could fight some of those CryptoKitties against each other? The creators say this is a common request and they’re considering it. Meanwhile, you might want to check out CryptoFighters to see just how fun a well designed fighting game can be.

Get a fighter from the marketplace – you’ll need to have some ETH and have the metamask browser extension to easily play this game. This enables the website to know what fighters you have without a login. Click here to get started with metamask extension.

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CryptoBots – battling blockchain bots!

Cryptobots is a blockchain-based app inspired by CryptoKitties, with clever new repackaging and graphics that seem to have been inspired by Homestar Runner.

The battle of Ethereum ERC-721 based token creatures continues with the beginnings of a cambrian explosion in crypto-whatevers. Today’s topic is the blockchain app called Cryptobots, where you can buy bots, manufacture your own bots, and battle your bots against others.

Buy a bot from the Cryptobots marketplace to get started, then battle it against others and get a free cryptobot if you win. You probably won’t, so try to manufacture a new bot instead, or just sell the damn thing and try again. Let’s take a closer look at doing all of these.

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Intro to Quantstamp

Quantstamp is a company building a smart contract auditing platform. The Quantstamp network will consist of validator nodes running tests against smart contracts, reaching consensus about the results, and producing audit reports from those results.

Quantstamp is also a network protocol, and there’s an ERC-20 token associated with the project trading by the symbol QSP. This token is used in the system to initiate audits and to reward participants, but more on that later. Let’s take a look at the protocol first.

Quantstamp’s stated goal is to create a protocol that can someday be merged directly into the Ethereum codebase. This protocol is basically a meta-protocol riding on Ethereum. That is to say, Ethereum network handles the transaction detail and publishing of blocks, and Quantstamp handles all logic for the security audit function.
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cryptokitties FTW!

Almost every blockchain enthusiast on Earth has encountered the feline frenzy called CryptoKitties in the past week or so. All the fun and games pretty much brought the Ethereum network on which it runs to a crawl.

Most commonly asked question seems to be, unsurprisingly, “What is it and how does it work?” I still wonder too, but find the whole thing fascinating. In a nutshell, you can buy, breed and sell these kitties. Oh yeah, they’re adorable.

How to get yourself an adorable cryptokitty?
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quickie: Bitcoin vs Ethereum

People ask about this a lot these days. Here’s my take on a quick, high-level comparison between these two blockchains.

Bitcoin was designed to be a digital money. Bitcoin has a huge address space, some of which have balances associated with them. These addresses are modified public keys, and the matching private keys are the one and only way to spend whatever Bitcoin there is. Note that “spend” means sending unspent outputs to some other address.

Ethereum was designed to be a full computer, all the nodes of which reach consensus about the state. Since this complexity exists already to save computational state, it saves account balances too. The token is issued in great quantities, which ensures the utility of these tokens but may not make them great stores of value. That utility I referenced is the ability to execute program logic on the network by sending tokens to contracts that cause them to execute code.

Bitcoin has a fixed supply of 21 million tokens, over 16 million of which have been issued. Ethereum does not have a fixed supply; the money supply inflates by around 10% a year currently.

I hinted at it before, but for 95% of the people asking this question are considering whether to invest. They really want to know about the relative strengths of these two as stores of value. Bitcoin is that high-risk, high-upside potential investment they’re looking for, and Ethereum is not as good a fit for their purposes.

Knockoff tokens, soundalike forks and a few scamcoins

I decided to go digital dumpster diving into the list of top 1000 cryptocurrencies by market cap to see how many Bitcoins I could find. And look how many Bitcoin knockoffs, wannabes, Bitcoin forks, and tricksters there are. Talk about brand dilution!

The whole spectrum is represented here; from early altcoins trying to tinker with basic assumptions about consensus mechanisms or block discovery times, all the way to some that are simply intended to confuse unwary investors.

Here’s the list, sorted by market cap, along with a bit of commentary. They might be sorted in terms of appeal as well, as there are some real stinkers in this bunch!

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